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DisABILITIES Awareness Month

National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM)  is a national campaign held in October that raises awareness about employment issues for disabled people, and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America’s workers with disabilities. NDEAM’s roots go back to 1945, when Congress enacted a law declaring the first week in October each year “National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week.” In 1962, the word “physically” was removed to acknowledge the employment needs and contributions of individuals with all types of disabilities. In 1988, Congress expanded the week to a month and changed the name to “National Disability Employment Awareness Month.” The Presidential Proclamation of 2015 states: “America is at its strongest when we harness the talents and celebrate the distinct gifts of all our people. This October, as we observe the 70th anniversary of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, let us pay tribute to all who fought for better laws, demanded better treatment, and overcame ignorance and indifference to make our Nation more perfect. In their honor, and for the betterment of generations of Americans to come, let us continue the work of removing obstacles to employment so every American has the chance to develop their skills and make their unique mark on the world we share.” During National Disability Employment Awareness Month, the National Consortium on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Courts recognizes the indispensable contributions people with disabilities have made and will continue to make in our economy, and we salute their efforts. Employment opportunities and legal rights should be made available to all people, regardless of disability, race, creed, color, national origin or gender.


Famous People with DisABILITIES

Fetty Wap

Fetty Wap

Fetty Wap was born Willie Maxwell in the financially strapped city of Paterson, New Jersey. At a young age, he lost the use of his left eye due to congenital glaucoma, a rare condition among newborns. He currently has an ocular prosthesis. Full bio

Cher

Cher

Singer and actress, Cher, who has a math learning disability, has been a mainstay of the Hollywood glitterati for more than three decades, and her personal star seems to be waxing still. She is a triple threat with successful records, an Academy Award, and a Grammy Award. Full bio

David Beckham

David Beckham

David Beckham, who has obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), is a retired professional soccer player. He spent much of his career with the Manchester United team, bolstering that organization's already legendary status in English football. Full bio

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Mexican artist Frida Kahlo suffered polio during her childhood and, according to some sources, also had spina bifida, which caused dysmetria in her right leg. Full bio

John Nash

John Nash, who had schizophrenia, won a Nobel Prize in economics in 1994 for formulating the idea of the Nash equilibrium. He has been celebrated in both a book on his life and an Oscar-winning movie (A Beautiful Mind). Full bio

Daniel Radcliffe

Daniel Radcliffe

Most notable for his role as Harry Potter, Daniel Radcliffe has lived with a mild case of dyspraxia for his entire life. Dyspraxia is a common neurological disorder that affects motor skill development. Full bio

Whoopi Goldberg

Whoopi Goldberg

Whoopi Goldberg, who has dyslexia, said of her experience "The advantage is that my brain sees and puts information in my head differently, more interestingly than if I saw like everyone else."  Full bio

Dan Akroyd

Daniel Edward Aykroyd a Canadian-American actor, comedian, musician, businessman and filmmaker was diagnosed with Tourette's and Asperger's Syndromes as a child. Full Bio
 


DisABILITIES Awareness Books @ MiraCosta Library

Succeeding As a Student in the Stem Fields with an Invisible Disability: A College Handbook for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Students with Autism, ADD, Affective Disorders, or Learning Difficulties and Their Families
Asperger's Syndrome - That Explains Everything: Strategies for Education, Life and Just About Everything Else
Inclusive Physical Activities: International Perspectives
The Asperkid's Launch Pad
Non-Visual Landscape: Landscape Planning for People with Vision Problems
A Disability History of the United States
Disabled Women and Domestic Violence: Responding to the Experiences of Survivors
Defying Disability: The Lives and Legacies of Nine Disabled Leaders
Dyslexia: A Visual Approach
Understanding Dyslexia: A Guide for Teachers and Parents
Rights Enabled: The Disability Revolution, from the US, to Germany and Japan, to the United Nations
Disability, Sport and Society: An Introduction
The Question of Access: Disability, Space, Meaning

DisABILITIES Awareness Films @ MiraCosta Library

Best and Most Beautiful Things

Best and Most Beautiful Things

A poignant Helen Keller quote led Garrett to Perkins School for the Blind outside Boston. This film is a celebration of outcasts everywhere, following a precocious young blind woman who disappears into quirky obsessions and isolation. With humor and bold curiosity, she chases love and freedom in a surprising, sex-positive community.

Crash Reel

Crash Reel

The dramatic story of one unforgettable athlete; one eye-popping sport; and one explosive issue, Traumatic Brain Injury. A comeback story with a difference. This visually arresting film seamlessly combines twenty years of stunning action footage and interviews as it follows U.S. champion snowboarder Kevin Pearce.

Normal People Scare Me Too

Normal People Scare Me Too

In this sequel documentary, the director interviews former and new cast members and family about attitudes and first-person perspectives/experiences in autism today. Normal People Scare Me Too was created with a film crew comprised of 75% autistic individuals.

Like the Others

Like the Others

Mental illness is still a taboo in our society, even more so when it concerns children. A rare insight into the daily life at a child and adolescent psychiatric centre – we meet dedicated therapists, parents and patients with very different problems, united in the struggle to feel "like the others".

The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia

The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia

A dyslexic high school student pursues admission to a leading college – a challenge for a boy who didn’t learn to read until 4th grade. Additional accounts of the dyslexic experience from children, experts, and iconic leaders at the top of their fields, help us to understand that dyslexia can be as great a gift as it sometimes is an obstacle.

Embracing Dyslexia

Embracing Dyslexia

Filmmaker Luis Macias learned that his eight-year old son, Alejandro, was dyslexic. Although diagnosed relatively early, Alejandro was held back in first grade due to poor reading and writing skills. The resulting film tackles the issues surrounding dyslexia like few other documentaries.

A Brave Heart

A Brave Heart

From the producers of the most viewed TEDWomen event of 2013 comes "A Brave Heart: The Lizzie Velasquez Story," a documentary following the inspiring journey of 26 year old, 58 pound Lizzie from cyber-bullying victim to anti-bullying activist. The film chronicles unheard stories and details of Lizzie’s physical and emotional journey up to her multi-million viewed TEDx talk.

Emmanuel's Gift

Emmanuel's Gift

Narrated by Oprah Winfrey, the film chronicles the life of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah, a young Ghanaian man born with a severely deformed right leg, who today, against incalculable odds, is opening minds, hearts and doors-and effecting social and political change throughout his country.

 

Twisted

Twisted

For people with dystonia, the search for the right signal puts them on the front line in cracking the code of the brain. When she was 17, independent producer Laurel Chiten hopped in a friend's car and woke up in an ambulance. Months later, her head began to twitch. Now she leads us on an almost science fiction-like trip to the frontier of medicine.